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Goodfellow

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I did some quick hunting for this but couldn't find anything in one place soooo...

 

Any chance for a compilation on the War of the Sisters, Belah'dah and Sil'dah? I'm thinking of using them (potentially) for a story arc in the near future and wanted to make sure I had the right sorts of information to run with.

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I did some quick hunting for this but couldn't find anything in one place soooo...

 

Any chance for a compilation on the War of the Sisters, Belah'dah and Sil'dah? I'm thinking of using them (potentially) for a story arc in the near future and wanted to make sure I had the right sorts of information to run with.

 

Quick correction before someone gets around to answering you: the War of the Sisters was between Sil'dih and the original Ul'dah, long after they resulted from Belah'dia being split in twain as a result of a succession crisis.

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I think the MNK quest-giver gives a fairly good summary when asked:

 

 

Erik: I need hardly mention that Sil'dihn civilization is now centuries dead.

Erik: Sil'dih was plunged into chaos in the wake of King Lalawefu's demise─or the King of Springs, as he was known. Despite the success of his economic reforms, the tax increases he imposed did not sit well with his subjects.

Erik: This, coupled with a prolonged sequence of untimely droughts, fomented unrest among the people and in time sparked violent unrest throughout the kingdom.

Erik: Sil'dih was not alone in its want for water. Ul'dah, too, felt the effects of the droughts.

Erik: The sultan at the time, Sasagan Ul Sisigan─ Ah! But perhaps you recognize the Ul name? The current sultana, Nanamo Ul Namo, represents the second Ul Dynasty. She is Sasagan's distant descendant.

Erik: Now...where was I? Ah, yes! Right, so, Sasagan ordered an attack on Sil'dih to claim the water resources discovered as a result of Lalawefu's flood control acts.

Erik: But the royalty and nobility of Sil'dih would not remain idle. They mobilized their nation in the face of this crisis, and the people fought with great tenacity against the Ul'dahn threat.

Erik: The full strength of both nations met in battle, and the end result was an arduous protracted conflict.

Erik: Though arguably more desirable than surrender, the ruling Sil'dihn elite took little pleasure in having succeeded in uniting the theretofore querulous citizenry to fight. For despite all they accomplished, every day spent waging war dragged the nation's financial affairs─which you will recall had only just been brought under control─back into the mire.

Erik: To bring an end to the long military deadlock, Sil'dih devised and set about implementing a perverse yet ambitious strategy.

Erik: It sought to zombify the deceased among its army, that they might fight again.

Erik: At first, it appeared to have worked. Yet at the height of hostilities, the Sil'dihns lost control over their necrotic creations. The undead turned on their masters, and before long the zombification had spread to a majority of the population.

Erik: Ever knowing an opportunity when they saw one, the Ul'dahns used this to justify their war─now proclaiming it a crusade to send these zombies to Thal. After seeing to the extermination of all zombies outside the city, they then sealed the gates of Sil'dih, entrapping both the living and dead within.

Erik: And that, in brief, is a history of the fall of Sil'dih. I only pray that your feeble mind is able to retain it.

 

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I did some quick hunting for this but couldn't find anything in one place soooo...

 

Any chance for a compilation on the War of the Sisters, Belah'dah and Sil'dah? I'm thinking of using them (potentially) for a story arc in the near future and wanted to make sure I had the right sorts of information to run with.

 

Quick correction before someone gets around to answering you: the War of the Sisters was between Sil'dih and the original Ul'dah, long after they resulted from Belah'dia being split in twain as a result of a succession crisis.

 

Sorry, I meant that as 3 separate topics, not to imply they were the same/together. I should've made that a little more clear.

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I did some quick hunting for this but couldn't find anything in one place soooo...

 

Any chance for a compilation on the War of the Sisters, Belah'dah and Sil'dah? I'm thinking of using them (potentially) for a story arc in the near future and wanted to make sure I had the right sorts of information to run with.

 

I can suggest that video: F4ikLQIHIUE

 

I think the MNK quest-giver gives a fairly good summary when asked:

 

 

Erik: I need hardly mention that Sil'dihn civilization is now centuries dead.

Erik: Sil'dih was plunged into chaos in the wake of King Lalawefu's demise─or the King of Springs, as he was known. Despite the success of his economic reforms, the tax increases he imposed did not sit well with his subjects.

Erik: This, coupled with a prolonged sequence of untimely droughts, fomented unrest among the people and in time sparked violent unrest throughout the kingdom.

Erik: Sil'dih was not alone in its want for water. Ul'dah, too, felt the effects of the droughts.

Erik: The sultan at the time, Sasagan Ul Sisigan─ Ah! But perhaps you recognize the Ul name? The current sultana, Nanamo Ul Namo, represents the second Ul Dynasty. She is Sasagan's distant descendant.

Erik: Now...where was I? Ah, yes! Right, so, Sasagan ordered an attack on Sil'dih to claim the water resources discovered as a result of Lalawefu's flood control acts.

Erik: But the royalty and nobility of Sil'dih would not remain idle. They mobilized their nation in the face of this crisis, and the people fought with great tenacity against the Ul'dahn threat.

Erik: The full strength of both nations met in battle, and the end result was an arduous protracted conflict.

Erik: Though arguably more desirable than surrender, the ruling Sil'dihn elite took little pleasure in having succeeded in uniting the theretofore querulous citizenry to fight. For despite all they accomplished, every day spent waging war dragged the nation's financial affairs─which you will recall had only just been brought under control─back into the mire.

Erik: To bring an end to the long military deadlock, Sil'dih devised and set about implementing a perverse yet ambitious strategy.

Erik: It sought to zombify the deceased among its army, that they might fight again.

Erik: At first, it appeared to have worked. Yet at the height of hostilities, the Sil'dihns lost control over their necrotic creations. The undead turned on their masters, and before long the zombification had spread to a majority of the population.

Erik: Ever knowing an opportunity when they saw one, the Ul'dahns used this to justify their war─now proclaiming it a crusade to send these zombies to Thal. After seeing to the extermination of all zombies outside the city, they then sealed the gates of Sil'dih, entrapping both the living and dead within.

Erik: And that, in brief, is a history of the fall of Sil'dih. I only pray that your feeble mind is able to retain it.

 

 

 

It is worthy of note that we discover at the end of that series that Sil'dih were the actual victims of the undead spells cast by Ul'dah, and not the contrary, and that the victors wrote final history on the matter, where the truth is know to only a select few.

 

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I did some quick hunting for this but couldn't find anything in one place soooo...

 

Any chance for a compilation on the War of the Sisters, Belah'dah and Sil'dah? I'm thinking of using them (potentially) for a story arc in the near future and wanted to make sure I had the right sorts of information to run with.

 

Actually just did a post about this on tumblr, but I'll throw some more info up on here.

 

 

Belah'dia

 

Forgive me. Of late' date=' I have been studying the works of a Belah'dian poet king, who wrote, “To ye who ask of things to come: give thought to what is past and gone.”[/quote']

 

You don't say? It's not every day someone comes to our halls to research Sil'dih. As a fellow student of history' date=' though, I more than welcome the conversation. Belah'dian civilization flourished in relative peace until twin sons were born to the royal family. The two were fierce rivals, and when they came of age and their father passed, each one claimed that he was the rightful heir to the throne. With neither son willing to relinquish his claim, they agreed to split their kingdom in two, forming the twin nations of Ul'dah and Sil'dih. But not unlike the two proud princes, the sibling nations developed a penchant for rivalry...[/quote']

 

Researching the ancient feud between Ul'dah and Sil'dih, are you? Most impressive! Young people these days show so little interest in learning from the past. Anyhow, I'm pleased to say I have more than a passing familiarity with ancient history. To understand the history of the sibling nations, one must go back further still, to the birth of their mother nation, Belah'dia.

 

The Fifth Astral Era was an age of untold wonders, when the arcane arts burgeoned and the great civilizations that commanded such powers flourished. This age of enlightenment would not last, however. Power bred avarice, and avarice bred resentment. It culminated in the War of the Magi, which brought the great floods of the Sixth Umbral Calamity, which in turn swallowed once-proud nations and left a battered wasteland in its wake.

 

Mages were reviled and persecuted for having caused this catastrophe, with many forced to leave their homelands or face death. It was a small band of those survivors that found their way to Thanalan, where they would found the nation of Belah'dia some eight centuries agone. Ah, imagine: a government of mages, by mages, and for mages! What wonders might have been wrought had Belah'dian civilization survived to this very day! Alas, this was not to be...

 

The nation of Ul'dah inherited its traditions from ancient Belah'dia' date=' a city founded by the descendants of the first mages. The secrets of these illustrious sorcerers were ultimately entrusted to the priests of the Order of Nald'thal, who have passed them down from generation to generation ever since. Focused and refined over centuries of use in the Order's funereal rites, the arcane magicks of our ancestors eventually emerged as the art we now know as thaumaturgy.[/quote']

 

When the Hyuran tribe came to Thanalan some 800 years ago, Albin the Ashen was at the head of one of the columns. Then-native Belah'dians rose against the invaders and prevailed, as history records. Albin was but one of many slain in the abortive conquest, yet his mortal coil still roams the land in search of vengeance.

 

Tell me' date=' have you heard of Winebaud? He was an explorer of some renown ten years ago, though he regrettably retired and passed on not long ago. It is said that he discovered a treasure worth one hundred million gil. That's right─one hundred million gil! Winebaud called it the most precious secret of Lalafuto III, who was sultan of Belah'dia some seven hundred years ago.[/quote']

 

The Sunken Temple of Qarn

Most scholars of ancient Belah'dian civilization claim this twisting labyrinth of complex chambers to be a place of worship dedicated to the sun goddess, Azeyma. Recent diggings, however, have uncovered older chambers buried beneath the new containing relics not of the Sixth Astral Era, suggesting that the temple may have been built by a different people.

 

Under the unforgiving Thanalan sun lie the ruins of an ancient temple half-devoured by the shifting sands of a timeless desert. Though used by ancient Belah'dians as a place to worship the sun goddess' date=' Azeyma, the massive underground structure appears to be far older than this Sixth Astral Era civilization. That, however, did not deter Belah'dian sultans from each adding their own chambers to the original construct in a bid to achieve immortality through creation. In the subsequent years since the fall of Belah'dia, many an adventurer has sought to explore the temple's mysteries and perhaps return with the treasure of a lost era... only to fall victim to one of the complex traps set to prevent that very thing from happening.[/quote']

 

The Invisible City

Buried under nearly a malm of solid rock, if it not for a gaping rent torn open by the Calamity, these ancient ruins may have gone undiscovered for another thousand summers. Scholars sent to Highbridge to study the site are currently of a mind that the structures are not a city, but in fact the tomb of one Lalafuto IV, famed sultan of Belah'dia.

 

What's this!? The ruins date back to the latter Belah'dian Era' date=' and house the final resting place of Lalafuto IV himself? The historical implications of this research are beyond anything the Order had imagined. I must arrange for additional researchers and supplies to be sent to Highbridge immediately![/quote']

 

It draws breath still' date=' the Invisible City, though the time of Belah'dia is long past. Do you not hear the stones that shroud the ruins, hear them turning? Click-click-click like a restless dog pacing its master's chamber floor. Bring them away, I beg you, thin the herd. The power, it grows.[/quote']

 

Have you perchance visited the ruins south of here? It is said that they date back to the era of the Belah'dians. As a student of history' date=' I was delighted when my superiors sent me there on patrol. My delight soon turned to dread, however, when I discovered the terrible truth─these ruins are haunted! Yes, you heard me right. Specters of Belah'dia haunt the place to this day, and my limited training has hardly prepared me to face such horrors. Would you be so obliging as to take this holy water and shepherd the lost souls to Thal's realm?[/quote']

 

Typically forged of stone and clay' date=' the magical monstrosities known as golems once served myriad masters at the height of the Fifth Astral Era. Though the craft of their creation is thought to be forgotten, it is not uncommon to glimpse these terrifying titans near ruins of the ancient city of Belah'dia.[/quote']

 

The large population of golems in southern Thanalan is ascribed by mainstream historians to the mages of Belah'dia, who made the sturdy guardians for the protection of the Temple of Qarn. Among these sad remnants of a civilization lost to time, Nunyunuwi stands out for his exceptional size and stealth. At rest, he vanishes into the landscape of tors and boulders. Only a sizable battle will rouse the stone soldier to his ancient duty: to fight to the death.

 

Born and bred in the city-state of Ishgard, the majority of company chocobos are geldings of the rouncey variety; however, massive destriers and miniature Belah'dian jennets are also raised to accommodate the builds of Roegadyn and Lalafell riders respectively.

 

These are naught more than the words of some lovesick buffoon to his beloved! Over and over he repeats the same hackneyed phrases, and his desire to “renounce,” to “forsake,” to “abdicate─” “Abdicate the throne...” Wait. Could it be that this was written by Lalafuto III!?

 

Many believed that the sultan's wife had him assassinated so that she could claim the throne for herself. Though that would seem the most likely explanation, his sudden disappearance remains a mystery to this day. Yet if these poems are to be believed, Lalafuto III was madly in love with his paramour, and wished to be free of his royal responsibilities. He was plotting to flee the capital in secret─and may very well have succeeded.

 

An ambitious courtier could have used these poems to gain favor with the sultana or her enemies. On one hand, they are arguably evidence that Lalafuto III still lived. On the other hand, one could assert that Memeto the Meek had him murdered for this ultimate betrayal...

 

A little more on Belah'dia here.

 

 

 

War of the Sisters

 

I need hardly mention that Sil'dihn civilization is now centuries dead. Sil'dih was plunged into chaos in the wake of King Lalawefu’s demise─or the King of Springs, as he was known. Despite the success of his economic reforms, the tax increases he imposed did not sit well with his subjects. This, coupled with a prolonged sequence of untimely droughts, fomented unrest among the people and in time sparked violent unrest throughout the kingdom. Sil'dih was not alone in its want for water. Ul'dah, too, felt the effects of the droughts.

 

The sultan at the time, Sasagan Ul Sisigan─ Ah! But perhaps you recognize the Ul name? The current sultana, Nanamo Ul Namo, represents the second Ul dynasty. She is Sasagan’s distant descendant. Now…where was I? Ah, yes! Right, so, Sasagan ordered an attack on Sil'dih to claim the water resources discovered as a result of Lalawefu’s flood control acts.

 

But the royalty and nobility of Sil'dih would not remain idle. They mobilized their nation in the face of this crisis, and the people fought with great tenacity against the Ul'dahn threat. The full strength of both nations met in battle, and the end result was an arduous protracted conflict. Though arguably more desirable than surrender, the ruling Sil'dihn elite took little pleasure in having succeeded in uniting the theretofore querulous citizenry to fight. For despite all they accomplished, every day spent waging war dragged the nation’s financial affairs─which you will recall had only just been brought under control─back into the mire.

 

To bring an end to the long military deadlock, Sil'dih devised and set about implementing a perverse yet ambitious strategy. It sought to zombify the deceased among its army, that they might fight again. At first, it appeared to have worked. Yet at the height of hostilities, the Sil'dihns lost control over their necrotic creations. The undead turned on their masters, and before long the zombification had spread to a majority of the population.

 

Ever knowing an opportunity when they saw one, the Ul'dahns grasped this turn of events to justify their war─now proclaiming it a crusade to send these zombies to Thal. After seeing to the extermination of all zombies outside the city, they then sealed the gates of Sil'dih, entrapping both the living and dead within.

 

Greetings, traveler. You would learn of the war between Ul'dah and the fallen sultanate of Sil'dih? It would be my pleasure to enlighten you. The two city-states coexisted for several generations until the bad blood between them boiled over, culminating in outright war. As you might deduce from the present state of affairs, Ul'dah emerged victorious, leaving its once-proud sibling nation in smoldering ruins.

 

As the histories tell it, the battles fought between the sister nations were the stuff of nightmares. In a desperate attempt to overcome Ul'dah’s superior numbers, Sil'dihn alchemists devised a most horrific strategem. Employing a frightful formula known as the Trader’s Spurn, they brought their fallen allies back from Thal’s realm. Some theories have it that they even employed the potion on those of the living who were too weak or wounded to fight.

 

Two scales, one of gold and one of silver. The gold of Ul'dah, weighing prosperity and power. The silver of Sil'dih, weighing knowledge and power. But the power sought by the two nations differed greatly─yes, greatly indeed. The power wrought by Ul'dahn prosperity was that of justice and good, while the power wrought by Sil'dihn knowledge was horrific beyond belief─the power to rip the living soul out of a man and render him a mindless killing machine. On this matter, the histories are clear.

 

But riddle me this, my friend: who writes the histories, and what does this say of the words writ within? Yes, truth can be elusive and fickle as the shifting sands… As one example, did you know that in the war against Sil'dih, Ul'dahn and Amalj'aa warriors fought side by side? Likely, you did not. And neither did I, until I encountered a faded passage in an ancient text buried deep in our archives.

 

And yet, in the histories read by the populace, you will see no mention of this most fascinating fact. Might it be that someone, at some time, deemed this particular truth less than convenient? Hm hm hm…? But I have said enough already…

 

The Ruins of Sil'dih

The city-states of Ul'dah and Sil'dih coexisted for generations until 400 years ago when bad blood festering betwixt the two sultanates culminated in the War of the Sisters - leaving Sil'dih a smoldering pile of rubble to be claimed by the shifting desert sands. The subsequent relocation of Ul'dah placed the city-state nearly directly above her fallen sibling.

 

It was Ul'dah that ordered the creation of that dreadful powder' date=' and wielded it as a weapon against our proud ancestors. The history of your glorious sultanate is built on a lie! The powder in my possession was stolen from the Ul'dahn army four centuries ago by one of my ancestors. They say it was his final act of courage in the moments before his leg fell off and his rotting head dropped from his shoulders. In the last days before our proud nation was razed to the ground, a band of the final survivors stole a vast quantity of the powder from the Ul'dahn vaults, hiding it away in a secret vault sealed with powerful magicks. This is the truth that the histories don't tell. The truth that this doe-eyed Sultansworn would kill to keep buried deep in the sands of Thanalan![/quote']

 

While the crimes perpetrated by you and your sister are unpardonable' date=' you are far from the only ones guilty. On behalf of the Syndicate, I offer my apologies for the false aspersions cast upon your ancestors. You said that the nation of Ul'dah was built on lies. Seeing what I have seen today, I cannot deny your words. It will not be an easy task to rewrite─nay, restore─history, but know this: I will do everything in my power to bring the truth to the fore.[/quote']

 

 

 

Sil'dih

 

Excuse me… That shard you had. Might I ask how you came by it? I see. Sil'dih must have been a truly vast city at its peak' date=' just as the histories say. Oh dear, forgive me for not explaining. I assumed you know. Sil'dih was an ancient city, located very near to Ul'dah. At one time, it prospered much as Ul'dah does now, but they lost a great war and the civilization crumbled. To this day, none know precisely what kind of city it was. But to gaze upon the sheer scale of the ruins, one can only imagine that it must have been as great and lively a city as our own.[/quote']

 

Do you remember before, when we talked about Sil'dih? There's barely a mention of the city in the histories, and none still live who remember it. But it was a beautiful city once, and prosperous. And now it is gone. Forgotten.

 

It must have been just like Ul'dah - No. it must have been less magnificent than Ul'dah. Less spectacular and less remarkable. Just an ordinary city where ordinary people lived ordinary lives, content and peaceful. Which only served to make it easier for people to forget about it. I come here to look upon the ruins because nobody else does. Nobody else seems to care. When I am gone, I doubt even the name of Sil'dih will be remembered.

 

Aye, and the research team was led by none other than Nenekko, our little sister! She's the one who wrote the book on the ruins of Sil'dih, the research to end all other research on the place!

 

Nobody except her was gonna figure out that Sil'dih and Ul'dah are both descended from the Belah'dian civilization! The Sunken Temple of Qarn is the native rock─no way in seven hells was she going to not lead that expedition!

 

 

 

Ul'dah

 

The Ul'dah that existed 600 years ago during the time of Sil'dih was actually a different Ul'dah than the one we know today. Following the exhaustive War of the Sisters, Ul'dah was relocated to rest atop its fallen sister Sil'dih in the Sagolii.

 

The Ruins of Sil'dih

The city-states of Ul'dah and Sil'dih coexisted for generations until 400 years ago when bad blood festering betwixt the two sultanates culminated in the War of the Sisters - leaving Sil'dih a smoldering pile of rubble to be claimed by the shifting desert sands. The subsequent relocation of Ul'dah placed the city-state nearly directly above her fallen sibling.

 

It was likely the city prior to the relocation that is referenced in this quote about the city being physically divided in two in honor of the Traders.

 

They are called the twins' date=' Nald and Thal. Or at times, the Traders. All of reality is governed by their two aspects, and they hold a ceaseless vigil to ensure order is maintained. Long ago, our city itself was split into two great sections, to mirror this truth. As a great teacher of mine once said, microcosm recapitulates macrocosm. We have since merged, and prospered for it. Perhaps the gods will someday mirror us.[/quote']

 

This relocation of Ul'dah to its modern home falls roughly in line with the short period in Ul'dah's history as the Thorne Dynasty, where a Hyuran noble family claimed the title of Sultan for a roughly 100 year period, between 300-400 years ago.

 

Three centuries past' date=' the city-state of Ul'dah was ruled by an iron-fisted sultan by the name of Baldric Thorne—a man feared across the region for his quick temper and his even swifter justice. Perhaps as punishment for his compassionless ways, the Twelve saw fit to bless the sultan with but a single daughter, Edvya, whom the sultan loved more than the sun and the moons.[/quote']

Forty years after the founding of the Thorne Dynasty' date=' sultan Baldric Thorne was blessed by the gods with a single daughter, Edvya, whom he loved fiercely. The history surrounding the two, now known as the "Legend of the Lost Lady" gave rise to the festival of Little Ladies' Day.[/quote']

 

Though most famous for the creation of the Little Ladies Day festival, it was the Thorne Dynasty who was likely responsible for the relocation and reconstruction of the new Ul'dah above the Sil'dih ruins. To accomplish this massive undertaking, the Sultan Thorne enslaved the gigant beast race and subsequently buried them beneath the sands when the job was done.

 

Abandoned once purged of ore, Copperbell Mines lay untouched for nigh on three centuries until Amajina & Sons Mineral Concern reclaimed the shafts - the guild's sights set on expanding the mines downward in an attempt to tap yet undiscovered veins of valuable metal. Unfortunately, it was not riches the powder kegs uncovered, but sheer terror, for when the smoke cleared, out poured an army of raging giants from the darkest recesses of the mines. The hecatoncheires - thralls of the lost Thorne Dynasty - were, at last, free from their lightless prison, three hundred years of hate fueling their madness.

The gigants are made up of three distinctive classes: the ruling class of gigas, the slave class of gigas, and the hecatoncheires - a second class of slaves who have spent the past several centuries trapped in a sealed mine. The enmity between the classes runs deep, and when any two converge, sparks will fly. But, when all three converge... the results can be devastating.

 

Though, to give Sultan Baldric Thorne some credit, he is also accredited with opening trade with the Miqo'te tribes of the deep Sagolii.

 

On the second row of the stage stands life-size figurines of two archers─referenced in Thorne Dynasty records as the Twin Bows. It is said that they served as bodyguards for Princess Edvya on the strict orders of her father' date=' the sultan. It is perhaps worth noting that despite their moniker, the two are of different races entirely. One is Hyuran, a midlander, not unlike the Royal House of Thorne which he did serve. The other is of Miqo'te blood, a Seeker of the Sun. The histories tell of how─after years of bitter struggle─the Thorne Dynasty at last succeeded in reaching across the desert and establishing trade with the U tribe, a fact which the existence of these dolls would seem to corroborate.[/quote']

 

 

Happy years those were' date=' but they would be short-lived. The second Ul Dynasty would soon rise, and the Thorne traditions would be abandoned...[/quote']

 

 

Okay, so all of the precursory lore out of the way- I actually have a question about this spot of lore in particular that I plan on asking Fernehalwes at Fanfest soon. And that is about Sasagan Ul Sisigan, the founder of Ul'dah and also, apparently, the starter of the War of the Sisters. He's accredited for both, except that these two events occurred 200 years apart (supposedly) and a few of the quotes above reference several generations have passed.

 

Founding of Ul'dah, 600 years ago:

The first row displays life-size recreations of the three legendary Sultansworn known collectively as the first paladins. Of particular interest are the blades that they brandish. Three blades forged from the same steel' date=' one each bestowed to the three great warriors who would attend the Royal House by the hand of Sasagan Ul Sisigan, [b']first of his name[/b] and founder of our nation. Curtana, Joyeuse, Durandal… Eras have passed, monarchs have risen and fallen, but the legends of these blades─and the men who did wield them─live on to this very day.

 

War of the Sisters, 400 years ago:

Right' date=' so, Sasagan ordered an attack on Sil'dih to claim the water resources discovered as a result of Lalawefu’s flood control acts.[/quote']

 

I've come up with two possibilities for this so far:

1) The War of the Sisters is described as a "protracted" conflict, perhaps the War of the Sisters actually began when Sasagan Ul Sisigan's brother, Lalawefu Sil Tatawefu passed away and while Sasagan may have started the confrontation, it continued on for the next 200 years?

 

2) In the above quote about the Sultansworn, Ul'dah's founder, Sasagan Ul Sisigan is described as being the "first" of his name, perhaps there was another Sasagan Ul Sisigan II or III and Erik just failed to mention the distinction?

 

Like I said, this is on my question list for Fernehalwes to clarify. But I hope this helps! ^^

 

EDIT: Went back and added more Belah'dian lore.

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On Voidsent hierarchy (old vid):

 

zd1sVIYB9Mk

 

 

On Belias, Ascians and the Void vs Hydaelyn (old vid), first part is of interest:

 

L7QRRvxmu28

 

 

Void Ark:

 

qRHfPAFfbxk

 

 

Not sure if it answers to everything since it's a lot of musings, but well.

 

 

 

Edit: before anyone starts yelling, I think that what he means by Void and Void creatures being filled with Aether is that voidsent consume Aether and are known to be born out of the aether seeping in the Void... which is devoid of everything. Not that the Void is aether in its own way, certainly not.

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I had a few lore questions if someone doesn't mind givin' me a hand.

 

Pretty new to RPing, and just today starting to work on a profile for the RPC Library. Back in the day I had a real PVP binge, and I was wanting to incorporate it into my character. My idea was to have him be an Immortal Flame who got sucked into the Frontlines skirmishes, and down the road was suspended for a reason I haven't quite put together yet. That time during he was suspended let him dip into the crime world, and even though the suspension's up and he'd be back, he'd be a lower rank (a la adventurer level, I think I saw something about free brigade?) to give more wiggle room for more criminal or just FC shenanigans. 

 

So what I was curious about is if this was something I could do, and what the actual lore is behind Frontlines. I always assumed it was some sort of training or mock battle, but I do remember a bit in the story about a lalafell trying to get some mega weapon I think?

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Which Vigil did House Haillenarte lose to the Dravanians? I thought I'd read that it was the Stone Vigil, but Lord Francel just told me that it was the Steel Vigil.

 

House Haillenarte lost both Vigils. You can find some of the lore about that in the thread about the four houses here.

 

So what I was curious about is if this was something I could do, and what the actual lore is behind Frontlines. I always assumed it was some sort of training or mock battle, but I do remember a bit in the story about a lalafell trying to get some mega weapon I think?

Carteneau Flats is where the final battle of 1.0 happened and where Bahamut unleashed his rampage. There are allagan remains found at the Flats that all three city-states cannot agree on what is the best course of action to deal with them. As such you have 'non-lethal' battles though accidents do occur.

 

Dialogue about frontlines course can be found here, http://xivdb.com/quest/67065/Like+Civilized+Men+And+Women+(Immortal+Flames)

 

In the 2.3 patch (Defenders of Eorzea) MSQ, refugee violence was incited in no small part by Teledji Adeledji who wanted the violence to push forward the Carteneau Reclamation (Act/Bill) in order to get the access of the weapon only known as 'Omega' (nothing else is really mentioned afaik).

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Summons... where do they come from and are they coming willingly? How close to the DnD/FR lore is it?

 

There are a few different forms of "summons" in FFXIV. I'll go a little bit into each one, which should help in looking for the right lore for the ones you're interested in!

 

There are:

  • Carbuncles - Aetherial beings summoned by Arcanists. The jewel and geometries used determine their skills and actions. Emerald Carbuncle, Topaz Carbuncle, Ruby, etc. They're basically a small split of the caster's aether and their autonomy is dependent on the caster.
     
  • Primals - Typically what you'd see as the named summons in previous Final Fantasy games. Ifrit, Ramuh, Shiva, Garuda, Titan, Leviathan, etc. These are thoughts and ideas given form. Typically, they're the god of a Beast Tribe and are worshipped. They're fully aetherial beings as well, but unlike a carbuncle, there is no single caster. They are summoned with crystals and faith/prayer and once being brought into being, seek out aether and followers to maintain their forms. 
     
  • Eikons - Garlean term for Primals taken from the Allags. There are however, Elder Primals (also called Eikons) who may or may not have ever been summoned to begin with. Little is known about them.
     
  • Primal-Egi - The essence of  a primal given form by a single caster using the Allagan summoning arts. In order  to summon the egi of a primal, the caster needs to have been "washed over" with their essence in order to give it form. Unlike Primals, they carry no will of their own and like carbuncles, are only as autonomous as the caster allows.
     
  • Faeries - An artificial Scholar companion used to give the Scholar access  to Succor (healing magic used by the Elementals). We currently know of the Eos and Selene stances, but there could be more. 

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I had a few lore questions if someone doesn't mind givin' me a hand.

 

Pretty new to RPing, and just today starting to work on a profile for the RPC Library. Back in the day I had a real PVP binge, and I was wanting to incorporate it into my character. My idea was to have him be an Immortal Flame who got sucked into the Frontlines skirmishes, and down the road was suspended for a reason I haven't quite put together yet. That time during he was suspended let him dip into the crime world, and even though the suspension's up and he'd be back, he'd be a lower rank (a la adventurer level, I think I saw something about free brigade?) to give more wiggle room for more criminal or just FC shenanigans. 

 

So what I was curious about is if this was something I could do, and what the actual lore is behind Frontlines. I always assumed it was some sort of training or mock battle, but I do remember a bit in the story about a lalafell trying to get some mega weapon I think?

 

The concept looks fine to me. I didn't see anything that looks infeasible.

 

for the Frontlines, Carteneau is an area that was damaged during The Calamity, 5 years before a Realm Reborn takes place. It was a battleground between the Eorzean Alliance (Gridania, Limsa Lominsa, and Ul'dah) and tyhe Garlean Empire. The game will explain it bit in detail, but the general gist of things is that there's a bunch of Allagan relics buried beneath the land. Because the territory is unclaimed, all three major city-states wants a piece of it. In order to go about this without engaging in full-scale war on each other, the Grand Companies compete with each other, and that's how we got Frontlines PvP in game.

 

The Lalafell you're thinking of is Teledji Adeledji, who is one of the Ul'dahn Syndicate members. (Top 10 richest people in Ul'dah. ...think of them as like the 1%, but with actual political power).

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Hey, also a new RPer over here! I'm currently working on getting into Balmung (for free, since I've no extra money on hand for a transfer...)

 

I was wondering if it's plausible for an Ishgardian to have been a Warrior of Light at Carteneau? The character I'm creating at the moment is the younger brother of a Warrior of Light, and a lot of his motivations rely on searching for / coming to terms with his possibly-deceased sister (a forgotten WoL). He's the fourth son of a minor noble house called Archambault, but seventh child overall.

 

So, if he's on the hunt for his WoL sibling, just how much would he remember about her? I know that any memories of the original Warriors are fuzzy if the person doesn't have the Echo, which I'm assuming he wouldn't since that'd be OP?

 

Also, another quick thing - I planned on making my character have an obsession with flying, and harbor a fair amount of disdain towards the clergy and how Ishgard is run (as a strict theocracy during the Dragonsong War). Would it be plausible to make him a Garlean sympathizer and/or a heretic? So far, his thirst for flying comes from general wanderlust and having a chance to one day show his WoL sister the world's skies. I thought that might coincide with wanting peace with dragons, or perhaps naively believing that Garlemald would be able to better rule Ishgard and end the war faster?

 

...If these questions belong in a different thread, my apologies! I can move 'em if it's better suited for, like, Character Workshop. Thank you!

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Hey, also a new RPer over here! I'm currently working on getting into Balmung (for free, since I've no extra money on hand for a transfer...)

 

Welcome to the RPC! I'll try to answer in chunks. I do know we've got some good writeups on Ishgardian lore and Warrior of Light (both 1.0-style and 2.0 style) by Sounsyy here. Search tool should pull up a lot of references!

 

I was wondering if it's plausible for an Ishgardian to have been a Warrior of Light at Carteneau? The character I'm creating at the moment is the younger brother of a Warrior of Light, and a lot of his motivations rely on searching for / coming to terms with his possibly-deceased sister (a forgotten WoL). He's the fourth son of a minor noble house called Archambault, but seventh child overall.

 

Ishgard had pretty much refused to help out with the Battle at Carteneau, citing that their dragon problem was more important that the rest of the land being conquered by the Garlean Empire. It's very unlikely any of them would have took part it in on any official means. There's no clear-cut "absolutely guaranteed there were no Ishgardians present" piece of text I've ever encountered, but the likelihood is pretty low unless that person had already left Ishgard prior-to or was possibly exiled.

 

So, if he's on the hunt for his WoL sibling, just how much would he remember about her? I know that any memories of the original Warriors are fuzzy if the person doesn't have the Echo, which I'm assuming he wouldn't since that'd be OP?

 

There's a lot already written on this specifically, but the general idea was exactly that. Memories of the 1.0 Warriors of Light have basically vanished without explanation, only remembers as a person standing in a light so bright, they could not be seen. For family members, RPers have come up with their own hadcanons about it. Some choose to imagine the person is just outright forgotten. Others may have believed to have simply done away or disappeared. You'd have room to work with stuff here, but the last thing a person would suspect was "oh, my brother/sister must have been a Warrior of Light!" It's more like the magic prevents them from being remembered. Even your fellow Scions don't remember you until another character who does points it out.

 

Also, another quick thing - I planned on making my character have an obsession with flying, and harbor a fair amount of disdain towards the clergy and how Ishgard is run (as a strict theocracy during the Dragonsong War). Would it be plausible to make him a Garlean sympathizer and/or a heretic? So far, his thirst for flying comes from general wanderlust and having a chance to one day show his WoL sister the world's skies. I thought that might coincide with wanting peace with dragons, or perhaps naively believing that Garlemald would be able to better rule Ishgard and end the war faster?

 

Garlean sympathizers exist. People with disdain for Ishgard's govenment exist. Ishgard would likely brand your character a heretic and either try to get them killed or exiled, if being friendly. (But Ishgard will claim anyone's a heretic if they can find enough "proof" to get it done).

 

...If these questions belong in a different thread, my apologies! I can move 'em if it's better suited for, like, Character Workshop. Thank you!

 

I'd recommend opening a Character Workshop thread for stuff specific to your character, keeping the Lore board strictly lore/reference. Because both Lore Discussion and Character Workshop were split off from RP Discussion, you'll find there are many threads with a lot of overlap, which is fine! We're not too strict around here, but it helps make searching a little easier for future reference. :>

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I have a not-on-Balmung character whose relative was a Carteneau Warrior of Light - his mum. All he knows is that she mysteriously disappeared five years ago, and he's looking for her to try and at least find closure on her semi-inevitable death.

 

He doesn't even remember that she used to be an adventurer. Her husband doesn't remember either.

 

Or the names of any of her friends (because they, obviously, were also at Carteneau).

 

It's sad. :'3

 

I'd pay attention to Una Tayuun's dialogue. She's a miqo'te NPC in the Waking Sands from your first visit there until after Titan, and she and her friends used to (presumably) be Warriors of Light. Her dialogue is pretty revealing of what the memory loss is like on the Warrior's side of things.

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I got all curious about the Heavens Ward suddenly. Where do they draw their nasty powers (I HAVE THE POWER), besides that it seems to be implied that Ascians probably initiated them? What kind of magic is it (THIS SHALL BE A MERCY)? What kind of info do we have on that?

 

I think I didn't pay enough attention to that stuff when I ran through  the MSQ the first time.

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I got all curious about the Heavens Ward suddenly. Where do they draw their nasty powers (I HAVE THE POWER), besides that it seems to be implied that Ascians probably initiated them? What kind of magic is it (THIS SHALL BE A MERCY)? What kind of info do we have on that?

 

I think I didn't pay enough attention to that stuff when I ran through  the MSQ the first time.

 

They were already all extremely skilled in battle beforehand, but the transformations and increased powers come from them being Primals the same way Thordan VII is. They're drawing on the same summoning as him to become Primal versions of the original twelve knights. They also may be tempered, but that hasn't been totally confirmed.

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Summons... where do they come from and are they coming willingly? How close to the DnD/FR lore is it?

 

There are a few different forms of "summons" in FFXIV. I'll go a little bit into each one, which should help in looking for the right lore for the ones you're interested in!

 

There are:

  • Carbuncles - Aetherial beings summoned by Arcanists. The jewel and geometries used determine their skills and actions. Emerald Carbuncle, Topaz Carbuncle, Ruby, etc. They're basically a small split of the caster's aether and their autonomy is dependent on the caster.
     
  • Primals - Typically what you'd see as the named summons in previous Final Fantasy games. Ifrit, Ramuh, Shiva, Garuda, Titan, Leviathan, etc. These are thoughts and ideas given form. Typically, they're the god of a Beast Tribe and are worshipped. They're fully aetherial beings as well, but unlike a carbuncle, there is no single caster. They are summoned with crystals and faith/prayer and once being brought into being, seek out aether and followers to maintain their forms. 
     
  • Eikons - Garlean term for Primals taken from the Allags. There are however, Elder Primals (also called Eikons) who may or may not have ever been summoned to begin with. Little is known about them.
     
  • Primal-Egi - The essence of  a primal given form by a single caster using the Allagan summoning arts. In order  to summon the egi of a primal, the caster needs to have been "washed over" with their essence in order to give it form. Unlike Primals, they carry no will of their own and like carbuncles, are only as autonomous as the caster allows.
     
  • Faeries - An artificial Scholar companion used to give the Scholar access  to Succor (healing magic used by the Elementals). We currently know of the Eos and Selene stances, but there could be more. 

 

Excellent answer, thanks.

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I'm in search of detailed lore on what the pieces of Balmung do to the land around where they are found (specifically very large chunks). I went with this as a huge part of my miqo'te and her clan's story based entirely off watching the intro movie and wondering what happens to the land where the debris falls. Luckily (and ironically) for me, it seems much of the main story for a Gridania start-up... is my characters backstory minus a few details. O.o

 

So anyroad, explain away in detail for a lore newb (spoilers okay).

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I'm in search of detailed lore on what the pieces of Balmung do to the land around where they are found (specifically very large chunks). I went with this as a huge part of my miqo'te and her clan's story based entirely off watching the intro movie and wondering what happens to the land where the debris falls. Luckily (and ironically) for me, it seems much of the main story for a Gridania start-up... is my characters backstory minus a few details. O.o

 

So anyroad, explain away in detail for a lore newb (spoilers okay).

 

Do you mean, Dalamud the moon, the loyal hound of Memphina?

 

Then you just have to wander around a lot of areas (Thanalan Burning Rocks, La Noscea East near Castrum Marineris and especially the North Shroud). The scars of the fall of Dalamud are clearly visible. Huge and tall crystalized parts of corrupted aether spring out of the land everywhere a massive chunk of it fell.

 

Gridania is said to have been the most impacted by the fall and the Elementals are extremely weakened from this as a result. The land is slowly healing, but there is a resurgence of all kind of tainted shit running around, twisted by all those corrupted aether seeping into the land (Fukushima style).

 

If you go watch a bit about the Binding Coil of Bahamut raid series, you can see the pieces of the moon are still more or less intact and functional and run deeeeeep into the ground (more than thousand malms under). And somehow seem to have some kind of self sustaining/self repairing nano machinery that slowly pieces everything back together pretty organically. You can go from La Noscea to Northern Thanalan through there, as seen at the end of BCoB T5.

 

The question might be... what is the source of all that corrupted aether? I would be tempted to say, it's from Bahamut itself... but... somehow I'm not especially satisfied with that answer.

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